• The painter who cut up his own masterpiece

    Pietre Vive Malta

    The newly-built Amsterdam town hall was to feature a stirring depiction of a legendary meeting, at night, between tribal chiefs about to revolt against their Roman invaders. The above painting is what Rembrandt, the great Dutch painter commissioned to paint the meeting, came up with. This is, according to art ...

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  • The Way of Man, Part 1

    Ian Diacono

    The hardest thing for an author to do, is to help his readers understand complexities in their simplest forms. Martin Buber does exactly that in his short remarkable book ‘The Way of Man’. Buber is said to have been one of the most significant religious thinkers of the twentieth century. ...

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  • Visualising the “Call”

    Pietre Vive Malta

    How can a call be “represented” visually? There is an entire sensory experience in between hearing and seeing, which gives them a considerably different communicative value. One may hear something without necessarily seeing it and, inversely, one may see something without necessarily hearing anything at all. The two, hearing and ...

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  • Processions: their multi-dimensional undertones

    Martin Bruno

    The act of moving along in a ceremonious manner might mean different things to different people. Some might simply identify this sort of public manifestation with religious processions, though the meaning can be extended beyond. Obviously one might object the intended appraisal or the comparison, but there is more than ...

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  • Disclosing Truth

    Martin Bruno

    The Greeks were fascinated by the truth, but their truth is understandably a system that embraces man’s search for himself and his (her) place in the cosmic order. Maybe it’s precisely this insight that attracts us to the old Hellenes, because like us they essentially sought to understand the grinded ...

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  • Easter Sunday

    Dr Mark Said

    Resurrection Sunday, more traditionally recognized as Easter Sunday, symbolizes “New Life.” Christians world-wide have attended church services commemorating the final days of Jesus Christ on earth. They have read bible passages recalling how He attended the Last Supper, was beaten and crucified, died, then arose from the dead, all of ...

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  • What the lives of monks and mothers have in common

    Mariella Catania

    With reference to Mrs. Muscat’s speech on woman’s day, parts of which were shown on a YouTube video clip, I would like to discuss the issue of ‘guilt’, that a stay-at-home-mum may feel, from a different perspective. It is interesting to note that the experience of a newly conceived life ...

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  • Yom Kippur: insights for Lent

    Martin Bruno

    Approaching Lent from a Jewish perspective, specifically correlated to Yom Kippur, might appear odd and yet with hindsight, it might help to enrich its significance. But what exactly does Yom Kippur propose? On this day it is forbidden to eat, to work, to message the body with oil, to have ...

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  • An Irrelevant life

    Silence Dogood

    “They don’t watch reality shows or spend hours online. Nor do they constantly text, raise productive families, or spend their holidays in Thailand.” I would also add that they don’t dye their hair red and paint their nails with ridiculous colours. I read this sentence in the Sunday Times column ...

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  • Our national anthem that I hate

    Christian Colombo

    Of course I know the national anthem written by Dun Karm Psaila and composed by Robert Sammut but I am not referring to that one, the one which we try to sing while standing up and putting on a solemn face. For that one it is easy to fake an ...

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